Eliphas Levi

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Eliphas Levi wrote many early books in which he proclaimed the virtues of Baphomet in ceremonial magic, stating it was the synthesis of all energy that makes up the earth and the heavens, a transcendental power that was capable of performing transmutation on any kind of matter. He felt the common people were too ignorant to redeem themselves, thus he developed his idea of an élite group of initiates that would lead the people to their final emancipation. He illustrated his concepts in the symbolic representation which he called the Baphomet in a book published in 1856, which is the horned devil, and this symbol is still used commonly today. A hundred years later, Anton LaVey and his atheistic Church of Satan adopted the Baphomet symbolism in 1966.

Eliphas Levi illustrated his concepts in the symbolic representation which he called the Baphomet in a book published in 1856, which is the horned devil, and this symbol is still used commonly today. A hundred years later, Anton LaVey and his atheistic Church of Satan adopted the Baphomet symbolism in 1966.

In Levi’s depiction of Baphomet, the goat-man is shown to be seated upon a black stone cube, portraying it with wings, breasts, and an emblazoned pentagram with an Islamic symbol of a lunar crescent on each side flank. This lunar and cube symbolism reflect the ancient sacrificial practices of moon goddess worship that directly connect to the spawn of the dark feminine satanic force of Black Lilith herself.

Sigil of Baphomet, Leviathan

Another depiction of Baphomet is that of the Sigil of Baphomet, wherein the horns, ears and chin of a goat form a pentagram surrounded by five Hebrew glyphs which spell the word Leviathan. In this context it is helpful to research the Beast Machine, Leviathan forces, and the Thothian Leviathans in the Ascension Glossary to find out why that is. To perpetuate the Baphomet Deception, it is further said to be the representation of a perfect human. Eliphas Levi also illustrated a magical symbol for the Tetragrammaton pentagram connected to the Yahweh Matrix, which he considered to be a symbol of the microcosm, or human being.[1]

Hermetic Order of Golden Dawn

These concepts greatly influenced the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, which greatly influenced the NAA alien abductee and Thothian poster boy for spreading Satanism on the earth, Aleister Crowley. Crowley adapted many of Levi’s ideas and took on the Baphomet as his own initiatory name in the Ordo Templi Orientis, Order of Oriental Templars (OTO). Crowley used Islamic terminology when he proclaimed himself as the Caliph of the OTO, which goes back to the Church of Rome’s covert influence in co-creating Islam and furthering its influence on the Luciferian Knights Templars in France during the Middle Ages.[2]

Occultist Beliefs, Albert Pike

To understand the mind of the occultist, is to understand that the belief systems they have been fed about the forces of Baphomet, are promoted to contain the ultimate knowledge of self-mastery that can be achieved while incarnated in the physical realm. Mastery over dark and light, synthesis of all polarities in arrangement to the Moral Relativity that is connected to their Personal Value System. Thus, in this belief system the goal is to master the Baphomet physical forces in order to achieve the ultimate knowledge and wisdom for manifesting one’s personal desires in the world, at will. The supposed knowledge gained from conjuring the Baphomet forces through the occult rituals or as participating alchemists, has been referred to as gaining the secrets of the nature that is hidden in the world, or that which opens the gateway to the secrets of secrets. Some of these secret society brotherhoods referred to God as the God of All Things, which was turned into the acronym GOAT. Hence, the symbolism of the goat faced demons Baphomet and Pan that have been commonly associated with the horned devil in Satanic rituals and occult seals used to evoke demonic powers. One of Albert Pike's influences was the French occultist, ceremonial magician and author Eliphas Levi who he quoted in his masonic handbook.[3]

References


See Also

Satanism

Mind Control

War Over Consciousness

Basic Principles of Psychological Warfare