Rod of Asclepius

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In Greek mythology, the Rod of Asclepius also known as the Staff of Asclepius (sometimes also spelled Asklepios or Aesculapius) and as the asklepian, is a serpent-entwined rod wielded by the Greek god Asclepius, a deity associated with healing and medicine. The symbol has continued to be used in modern times, where it is associated with medicine and health care, yet frequently confused with the staff of the god Hermes, the caduceus. Theories have been proposed about the Greek origin of the symbol and its implications. [1]

Rod of Asclepius, Serpent Rods

To start connecting the dots, let us bring to mind the Caduceus staff that is used to symbolically represent the Controller Pillar of the medical and pharmaceutical corporations, as well as what is promoted as the health care systems. The Caduceus is the traditional symbol of Hermes and features two snakes winding around a winged staff. It is often mistakenly used as a symbol of medicine instead of the Rod of Asclepius, a serpent-entwined rod wielded by the Greek god Asclepius, a deity associated with healing and medicine. Both of these serpent symbols have continued to be used in modern times, where it is associated with medicine and health care.[2]


References

See Also

Caduceus Network

Gravitron

Beast Machine