Theatre of the Absurd

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World War II was the catalyst that finally brought the Theatre of the Absurd to life. The global nature of this conflict and the resulting trauma of living under threat of nuclear annihilation put into stark perspective the essential precariousness of human life. Suddenly, one did not need to be an abstract thinker in order to be able to reflect upon absurdity: the experience of absurdity became part of the average person's daily existence. The most famous, and most controversial, absurdist play is probably Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot. The characters of the play are strange caricatures who have difficulty communicating the simplest of concepts to one another as they bide their time awaiting the arrival of Godot. The language they use is often ludicrous, and following the cyclical patter, the play seems to end in precisely the same condition it began, with no real change having occurred.[1]

Social Norms Mirror Theatre of the Absurd

To maximize the efficiency of the Negative Alien Agenda’s gradual takeover of the planet through psychological warfare, their goal is to intentionally destroy moderate and humanitarian social norms as value systems, in order to covertly infiltrate the main societal organizational structures of humanity. Social Norms are familiar understandings that govern the behavior of members in a society. The roles of norms are collective consciousness representations, which emphasize and guide human behavior in certain situations or are observed in the environment as mental representations that inform appropriate behavior. The covert mainstream agenda is to control social norms to be intentionally guided into extremism and fanaticism, to bring forth the Theatre of the Absurd and absurdist behavior. Essentially, a reality bubble that is devoid of meaning in establishing humanitarian values, personal Accountability and common sense, breaking down society into a well-designed parody of tragic comedy.

Absurdism is a philosophical school of thought stating the belief that human beings exist without meaning, purposelessly floating in a chaotic universe. In the Theatre of the Absurd, the conflict is the human tendency to seek inherent value and meaning in life and God when there is no meaning to be found. The destructive and bloody aftermath of World War II stimulated absurdist views to rationalize such examples of human anguish and annihilation, which allowed for its popular development in many of the war torn social environments. Black Sun Programming took advantage of this vulnerable time in human history to up their game, through advancing Social Engineering experiments into absurdism.

Thus, our 3D world was socially engineered to produce a myopic mental polarization upon gratifying purely physical sensations and indulging excessive materialistic based pursuits to produce a spiritually bankrupt population. Such a superficial culture is set up to place value on gaining power and control in any way that fosters instant gratification for selfish motivations, rewarding those without Impulse Control or Empathy. When there is no value or meaning given to life, there is no accountability, no moral or ethical consideration towards the consequences of actions that are directly related to radically increasing world pain and human suffering, such as what happened in World War II. Thus, this absurdist social climate intentionally destroys integrity to produce psychopathic behaviors, making it increasingly hard to energetically interact with many of the corrupt 3D systems.[2]

References

  1. [theatre of absurd, Jerome Crabb 2006]
  2. Personal Integrity

See Also

Absurdism

Spirit of Self-Righteousness

War Over Consciousness